Drug/Alcohol Abuse Prevention (School-based)RSS

Add your listing here

School-based drug and alcohol prevention programs occur during the school day, or on school campuses.  Because drug and alcohol use is highly influenced by the attitudes and perceived norms of peers, school-based approaches that are open to every student in the school are needed, in addition to approaches that target drug-using teens (Winters, 2007). School-based programs may include school-day, extended-day, or afterschool programs, may be delivered by school personnel or by community-based facilitators, and may be mandatory (like a health education class) or voluntary (like an elective or a drop in afterschool program).

 

Effective approaches to school-based drug and alcohol prevention include teaching students how to resist peer influences, improving generic life skills, involving families, and providing opportunities to become involved in positive experiences with others in the school and community (NIDA, 2003). In contrast, ineffective approaches include those that group substance users together (; NIDA, 2003) and approaches that focus only on information dissemination or teaching about the dangers of substance use (Dishion & Andrews, 1995; NIDA, 2003; Soole et al., 2005; Tobler et al., 2003). Effective programs for elementary school students address issues such as self-control, emotional awareness, communication skills, and social problem-solving skills; and effective programs for older students seek to build communication skills; self-efficacy and assertiveness, and drug resistance skills (NIDA, 2003).

 

Substance use prevention programs should be long-term and include booster sessions to prevent program impacts from decaying over time (NIDA, 2003, Botvin & Griffin, 2003). Programs should also be implemented for an adequate number of hours (at least 11 hours, according to Tobler et al., 2000). When substance use is rampant within the community, school-based drug prevention programs can be implemented in conjunction with community-based strategies that reduce risk factors such as the availability of drugs and alcohol and promote norms that discourage underage drinking and drug use (Winters, 2007). (By ChildTrends)

 

The Favorable Attitudes toward ATOD Use scale is part of the Communities That Care (CTC) Youth Survey. This survey is designed to measure adolescent antisocial behaviors such as drug use, delinquency, and school dropout, and the risk and protective factor ...

The questions provided by this tool come from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) which is part of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS). With versions available for middle school and high school, this survey is designed to assess priority ...

This form aims to capture participants' perceptions of program leader performance. This is an easy form for adolescent or young adult participants to complete following a program session. It should take no longer than 5 minutes to complete. 

This is an example of a simple fidelity tool from Project ALERT. This tool tracks the implementation of core lessons.  Pages 5 to 20 assess curriculum delivery.

The Drug Refusal Assertiveness Scale is one dimension of assertive behavior derived from a factor analysis of the Gambrill-Richey Assertion Inventory.  Items from that inventory were adapted to be applicable to an adolescent population, and other dimensio ...

This is an example of an attendance sheet that can be used to track program participation. An excel version of this tool can be made. Excel functions (sum and average) can be added so that the total number and percent of sessions attended is automatically ...

The questions provided by this tool come from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) which is part of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS). With versions available for middle school and high school, this survey is designed to assess priority ...

The questions included on this tool are part of the Communities That Care (CTC) Youth Survey. This survey is designed to measure adolescent antisocial behaviors such as drug use, delinquency, and school dropout, and the risk and protective factors that in ...

The questions provided by this tool come from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) which is part of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS). With versions available for middle school and high school, this survey is designed to assess priority ...